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Saturday, June 11, 2011

The Black Death of the 21ST Century

The great waves of plague that twice devastated Europe and changed the course of history had their origins in China as did a third plague outbreak that struck less harmfully in the 19th century.

The causative agent of the most deadly plague, the Black Death, was the bacterium known as Yersinia pestis.
This agent had always been the favored cause, but a vigorous minority of biologists and historians have argued the Black Death differed from modern cases of plague studied in India, and therefore must have had a different cause.

The Black Death began in Europe in 1347 and carried off an estimated 30 percent or more of the population of Europe. For centuries the epidemic continued to strike every 10 years or so, its last major outbreak being the Great Plague of London from 1665 to 1666. The disease is spread by rats and transmitted to people by fleas or, in some cases, directly by breathing.



Medieval Europe was invaded by two different sources of Yersinia pestis. One strain reached the port of Marseilles on France’s southern coast in 1347, spread rapidly across France and by 1349 had reached Hereford, a busy English market town and pilgrimage center near the Welsh border.

The strain of bacterium analyzed from the bones and teeth of a Hereford plague pit dug in 1349 is identical to that from a plague pit of 1348 in southern France, suggesting a direct route of travel. But a plague pit in the Dutch town of Bergen has bacteria of a different strain, which the researchers infer arrived from Norway.

The Black Death is the middle of three great waves of plague that have hit in historical times. The first appeared in the 6th century during the reign of the Byzantine emperor Justinian, reaching his capital, Constantinople, on grain ships from Egypt. The Justinian plague, as historians call it, is thought to have killed perhaps half the population of Europe and to have eased the Arab takeover of Byzantine provinces in the Near East and Africa.

This plague (E. Coli) even though came from Soya sprouts doesn’t come from China.
It comes directly from a Lab.
No infected man put it in the sprouts, it was the opposite.
The hand who began the process was a glove protected hand, may be using a syringe.

This or a similar one is going to be the Black Death of the 21ST Century.
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